In response to national unrest and protests following the death of George Floyd and other unarmed persons of color by police officers, Westbank Libraries have provided reading and viewing lists to help our community increase its understanding of black history in America and the ways in which racism has been perpetuated through systems, policies, and unconscious bias. Community Conversations, beginning in July 2020, offer adults and teens an opportunity to share what we are learning. If all sessions fill up, we will schedule additional sessions.

Thank you for registering to join in a community conversation about racism.
We will email you with an assigned discussion date and time, your Zoom link, and a list of conversation prompts that will guide our discussions.


AdultTeen

Which dates and times would work for you to join in a discussion? You can choose more than one.


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YesNo

If these conversation sessions fill up, we may open additional sessions. We will contact you if you said No to all three dates or if you are waitlisted for a future date.

Ground Rules:
  1. Be respectful and listen when others are speaking.
  2. Allow everyone’s voice to be heard that wants to be heard.
  3. Keep an open mind – we’re not all going to agree.
  4. Please keep your video on for the discussion, but mute if there is background noise.
  5. Respect the privacy of others by not reporting what you hear in this conversation with any specificity or attribution. 
Prompts: May be adjusted by the facilitator as the conversation progresses
  1. What do you hope to get out of today’s conversations?
  2. What have you read or watched about racism prior to this conversation?
  3. Conversations about race can be uncomfortable – is this uncomfortable for you and how?
  4. In reading about racism, what did you learn?
  5. For those that identify as white, what ways has white privilege benefited you that you would be willing to share?
  6. What are some of the issues we face in understanding racism?
  7. Many of the suggested books about racism ask the reader to become anti-racist. What does that mean to you?
  8. What can people do to actively affect racism? Are there some local anti-racist efforts in our community that you would like to share?